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Monday, April 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Assessing the productivity of information technology equipment in U.S. manufacturing industries found in the catalog.

Assessing the productivity of information technology equipment in U.S. manufacturing industries

Catherine J. Morrison

Assessing the productivity of information technology equipment in U.S. manufacturing industries

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Information technology -- United States -- Economic aspects.,
  • Industrial productivity -- Econometric models.,
  • Information technology -- Costs -- Econometric models.,
  • Manufacturing industries -- United States -- Econometric models.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementCatherine J. Morrison, Ernst R. Berndt.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper no. 3582., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 3582.
    ContributionsBerndt, Ernst R., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination21 p. ;
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22438258M

    - information technology (IT): science and use of computers and other elec- tronic equipment to store, process, and send information. Information technology is heavily ingrained in today's business operations. This includes electronic data processing, the use of bar codes to identify and track goods, obtaining point-of-sale information, data. Previous related research indicates that labor and partial factor productivity may in fact be increasing in the U.S. construction industry. This research examines the effect of technology, specifically equipment technology, on productivity. Changes in labor and partial factor productivity are analyzed for activities from to


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Assessing the productivity of information technology equipment in U.S. manufacturing industries by Catherine J. Morrison Download PDF EPUB FB2

Published as "High-Tech Capital Formation and Economic Performance in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: An Exploratory Analysis", JE. Published as "Assessing Productivity of Information Technology Equipment in U.S.

Manufacturing Industries", Review of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 79, no. 3 (): ASSESSING THE PRODUCTIVITY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EQUIPMENT IN U.S. MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ABSTRACT In this paper we report results of an empirical assessment of the cost reducing impacts of recent dramatic increases in stocks of "high—tech" office and information technology equipment (0) using annual data from various two digit US.

Catherine J. Morrison, "Assessing The Productivity Of Information Technology Equipment In U.S. Manufacturing Industries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol.

79(3), pagesAugust. Downloadable (with restrictions). We assess the cost-reducing impacts of increasing stocks of "high-tech" equipment (O capital). Our empirical analysis is based on a dynamic production theory model and annual data for two-digit U.S.

manufacturing industries (). We find evidence of overinvestment in O capital in the mid to late s, following a period of strong investment.

Get this from a library. Assessing the productivity of information technology equipment in U.S. manufacturing industries. [Catherine J Morrison; Ernst R. Get this from a library. Assessing the Productivity of Information Technology Equipment in U.S.

Manufacturing Industries. [Ernst R Berndt; Catherine J Morrison; National Bureau of Economic Research.;] -- In this paper we report results of an empirical assessment of the cost reducing impacts of recent dramatic increases in stocks of "high-tech" office and information technology.

Morrison, C.J. and Berndt, E.R. Assessing the Productivity of Information Technology Equipment in the U.S. Manufacturing Industries. National Bureau of Economic Research. Morrison, C. and E. Berndt, "Assessing the Productivity of Information Technology Equipment in the U.S.

Manufacturing Industries", National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper(January ). Morrison, C.J. and Berndt, E.R., “Assessing the Productivity of Information Technology Equipment in the U.S. Manufacturing Industries,” National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No.

Google ScholarCited by:   Computer subsector productivity growth in excess of 20% was not sustainable, even for an innovative, forward-looking industry. And this remarkable performance masked a less than exciting profile for much of the manufacturing sector.

U.S. manufacturing, in effect, could be said to have been in a productivity bubble. Investing in Information Technology: Productivity Payoffs for U.S. Industries Kevin J. Stiroh Although firms have invested billions of dollars in information technology to boost their productivity, many analysts continue to question whether these investments do in fact lead to productivity gains.

[], "Assessing the Productivity of Information Technology Equipment in U.S. Manufacturing Industries," National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper No. (January). Nelson, R. [], "Research on Productivity Growth and Productivity Differences: Dead Ends and new Departures," Journal of Economic Literature, Vol.

Stiroh () have shown that U.S. productivity growth has been concentrated in the service industries sinceespecially those that make intensive use of information technology.

NAICS also provides more detail on industries that produce information technology hardware, software, and File Size: KB. The present volume provides a state-of-the-art review of the realities of technology management and manufacturing strategy.

As described in the Editor's Introduction, we address four topics: The Nature of New Manufacturing Technology, Innovation and Manufacturing Strategy, Productivity Management, and Technology Management and Organ­ ization.

The productivity paradox refers to the slowdown in productivity growth in the United States in the s and 80s despite rapid development in the field of information technology (IT) over the same period.

As highlighted in a widely cited article by Erik Brynjolfsson, productivity growth slowed down at the level of the whole U.S.

economy, and often within individual sectors that had. Information technology and U.S. productivity growth or organised segment of manufacturing industries in India, and one of the first few attempts that have made so far to build such ICT series. Morrison, C. Assessing the productivity of information technology equipment in U.S.

manufacturing industries. Review of Economics and Statistics 79(3): Google Scholar Cross Ref; Mukhopadhyay, T., F.

Lerch, and V. Mangal. Assessing the impact of information technology on labor productivity-A field study. Technology like automation, analytics and the Internet of Things is undoubtedly making manufacturing more productive and efficient.

The State of Manufacturing Technology Report surveyed nearly manufacturers and found that 90% had achieved growth in the past five years, with 35% of them attaining growth rates of 20% or more.

Computer and peripheral equipment manufacturing Communications equipment manufacturing Semiconductor and other electronic component manufacturing Software publishing Total IT Value Added Shares of Information Technology by Type, Share of.

Efficiency in Manufacturing and the Need for Global Competition ON AVERAGE, manufacturing productivity (measured by real value added per hour) is higher in U.S. operations than in Japanese or Euro File Size: KB. Moon et al. Exploring Different Roles of Information Technology for Productivity Proceedings of the Fourteenth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Toronto, ON, Canada August 14thth 2 study and a data mining method is applied to compare the different roles of IT in the two types of industries in terms of productivity.

Engineering Management International, 4 () Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam -Printed The Netherlands EVALUATION OF PRODUCTIVITY AND TECHNOLOGY MEASURES IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES O. Hawaleshka and A. Mohamed Mechanical/Industrial Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2.

Cited by: 4. Productivity and Costs by Industry: Manufacturing and Mining Industries. Table of Contents. Productivity and Costs by Industry: Manufacturing and Mining Industries -- U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Office of Productivity and Technology PSB Suite 2 Massachusetts Avenue NE Washington, DC Suggested Citation: "Executive Summary." National Research Council.

Information Technology for Manufacturing: A Research Agenda. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: / A manufacturing business is devoted to the production of tangible objects that are high in quality and competitive in cost, meet customers.

advantage of the current wave of complex, information technology related innovation. Weakness in capital formation has contributed substantially to slow growth in labor productivity.

growth in U.S. manufacturing Productivity measurement cannot be restricted to capital and labor factors—intermediate inputs constitute too large a part of the cost structure; revised and extended data show upward trend in multifactor productivity growth W illiam Gullickson W illiam Gullickson is an economist in the Of fice of Productivity and.

Cliff Waldman regularly writes and speaks on the U.S., Asian, and global economic outlooks as well as demographic trends, 3D printing, productivity, and labor issues.

Inhe directed a large project for the Southern Governors’ Association that analyzed the potential for advanced manufacturing cluster development in the American South. acceleration. Even when the particularly strong productivity industries that produce IT (or even durable goods manufacturing as a whole) are excluded, the data show a significant acceleration in productivity for the remaining industries.

This suggests the U.S. productivity revival is not narrowly based in only a few IT-producing industries. Bottom output growth U.S. manufacturing industries U.S. Employment Cost Index by quarter Average hourly compensation costs in the automotive industry inby country. • Morrison, C.J. and Berndt, E.R.

() “Assessing the Productivity of Information Technology Equipment in the U.S Manufacturing Industries”, National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper #, January. • Loveman G.W. () “An Assessment of. Here are the 12 most important metrics to measure in manufacturing that are essential for a successful business Manufacturing cycle time.

Cycle time is the total time from the beginning to end of a process. In manufacturing, it measures the time taken for a product to pass through all machines, processes and cycles to become a finished product.

Measure non-manufacturing productivity in dollars instead of units This formula works well in a factory-type setting, where each unit is of equal size and value.

But in other types of businesses, it can fail to take into account complex jobs, different types of roles and working styles, and other factors. Many of the nine advances in technology that form the foundation for Industry are already used in manufacturing, but with Industrythey will transform production: isolated, optimized cells will come together as a fully integrated, automated, and optimized production flow, leading to greater efficiencies and changing traditional production relationships among.

industries. Syverson (), for example, demonstrates that within 4-digit SIC industries in the U.S manufacturing sector, the ratio of total factor productivity among plants at the 90th percentile of productivity distribution is in the order of 2 to 1 with File Size: KB.

Morrison, C.J. & Berndt, E.R. Assessing the productivity of information technology equipment in U.S. manufacturing industries. National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper No.

(January)Cited by: Chapter 2 focuses on four long-standing obstacles to construction productivity that are most relevant to the task of the NRCâ s Committee on Advancing the Competitiveness and Productivity of the U.S.

Construction Industry: limited use of automated equipment and information technologies, attracting and retaining skilled workers and recent. Manufacturing Handbook of Best Practices: An Innovation, Productivity, and Quality Focus gives you a working knowledge of today's cutting edge tools - preparing you for the way you will be doing your job tomorrow.

With contributions from seasoned manufacturing experts, the book provides a single-sou. Buy The Management of Productivity and Technology in Manufacturing by Paul R. Kleindorfer (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. This study seeks to shed light upon the strategic value of information technology (IT) investments.

Previous literature suggests that IT investments per se are not sufficient for improving firm performance. Drawing from the resource-based view, it is hypothesized in this study that IT investments can deliver higher firm performance if they are 1) combined with complementary Cited by: 3.

In just the U.S., an estimated 9% of the workforce are in the business of making things. Encompassing a broad array of industry segments from the manufacturing of semiconductors to the construction of ports and commuter rail lines, Industrial Info's Industrial Manufacturing Industry Platform covers a very diverse range of projects and plants in.

paper for the National Bureau of Economic Research on the contribution of information technology to productivity gains during the s and mids, with insight on future GDP growth rates.Information technology fueled a surge in U.S.

productivity growth in the late s and early s. However, this rapid pace proved to be temporary, as productivity growth slowed before the Great Recession. Furthermore, looking through the effects of the economic downturn on productivity, the reduced pace of productivity gains has continued and suggests that average .Information technology: Increasing productivity in services effectively to these industries and activities, U.S.

standards of living, economic growth, and competitiveness will suffer seriously. The service sector spent over outperformed manufacturing in .